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Ollie Robinson Fined by ECB Over Racist, Sexist Social Media Posts

New Delhi: England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) on Saturday announced that a Cricket Discipline Commission (CDC) Panel decided to fine England pacer Ollie Robinson £3,200 and suspend him for eight matches, five of which will be suspended for two years, for his offensive social media posts.

England cricketer Ollie Robinson has been suspended from International Cricket (Photo Credit: ECB on Twitter)

New Delhi: England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) on Saturday announced that a Cricket Discipline Commission (CDC) Panel decided to fine England pacer Ollie Robinson £3,200 and cleared for a return to the national team ahead of England’s Test series against India. Robinson had previously admitted breaching ECB Directives 3.3 and 3.4 in relation to a number of offensive social media posts on Twitter which were shared between 2012 and 2014, when he was aged between 18 and 20.

The above-mentioned tweets came to light on 2 June 2021, which was also the first day of his first Test match for the Three Lions.

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“As regards the three matches which are the subject of immediate suspension, the Panel has taken into account the suspension imposed by the England Team from the second LV= Insurance Men’s Test against New Zealand, together with two of the Vitality Blast T20 matches from which Robinson voluntarily withdrew himself from selection for Sussex CCC due to the impact of these proceedings,” ECB said in their official release today.

As a result, Robinson is free to play cricket immediately.

The official release also stated that, “the Panel took into account a number of factors including the nature and content of the tweets, the breadth of their discrimination, their widespread dissemination in the media and the magnitude of the audience to whom they became available.”

ECB also stated that the Panel considered there was significant mitigation, including the time that had elapsed since the tweets were posted, and a number of personal references which demonstrated that Robinson, who chose to address the Panel, is a very different person to the one who sent the tweets.

Tom Harrison, ECB Chief Executive Officer also expressed his thoughts on it and said: “We accept the decisions made by the Cricket Discipline Commission and the sanctions they have imposed.”

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“Ollie has acknowledged that, whilst published a long time ago when he was a young man, these historic tweets were unacceptable. He has engaged fully in the disciplinary process, admitted the charges, has received his sanction from the CDC and will participate in training and use his experiences to help others,” he added.

“We stand against discrimination of all forms, and will continue working to ensure cricket is a welcoming and inclusive sport for all,” he further said.

Meanwhile, Ollie Robinson said: “I fully accept the CDC’s decision. As I have said previously, I am incredibly embarrassed and ashamed about the tweets I posted many years ago and apologise unreservedly for their contents.”

“I am deeply sorry for the hurt I caused to anyone who read those tweets and in particular to those people to whom the messages caused offence. This has been the most difficult time in my professional career for both my family and myself,” he added.

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