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Aam Aadmi Party to Contest on All Seats in 2022 Gujarat Assembly Elections

Arvind Kejriwal, National Convenor of the AAP announced this decision while addressing a press conference ahead of the inauguration of the AAP Office.

Arvind Kejriwal (Source: AAP Twitter)
Well Known Gujarati journalist Isudan Gadhvi joined Aam Aadmi Party Source: Arvind Kejriwal Twitter)

New Delhi: The Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) on Monday (June 14) announced that it will contest all seats in the Gujarat Legislative Assembly Elections in 2022. Arvind Kejriwal, National Convenor of the AAP announced this decision while addressing a press conference ahead of the inauguration of the AAP Office.

“The AAP will contest each and every seat in the 2022 Gujarat Assembly elections. The AAP is a credible alternative to the BJP and Congress. Gujarat will change soon,” he said.

Furthermore, famous Gujarati news anchor Isudan Gadhvi also joined the party.

The Delhi CM in a tweet in Gujarati said, “I welcome Mr. Isudan Gadhviji, a well-known journalist from Gujarat, to the Aam Aadmi Party family. I’m confident that Isudan Bhai will definitely fulfill his dreams for Gujarat together with the people of Gujrat Now, Gujarat will see Change.”

Assembly Elections in Gujarat will be held in December 2022.

The BJP had won 99 seats in the previous elections while the Congress showed a much-improved performance and they got 77 seats.

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